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TMG and Onedrive


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#1 hmscook

hmscook

    Timothy Cook

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 09:07 AM

Hello Everyone,

 

I am thinking of of moving my working TMG files to Onedrive. Has anyone any experience with using TMG data files and a cloud system such as Onedrive? Just wanted to see if there were any pitfalls or problems to work out before I do this.

 

Thanks!

 

Tim Cook

Busby, MT



#2 Michael Hannah

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 01:13 PM

NO! NO! NO!

 

Do not allow OneDrive to touch or monitor or do anything with the TMG data folders!!  By personal experience this can corrupt your files and projects.

 

Always ensure that all the TMG data folders are on your local disk and not under any control of a cloud or backup system.  Run TMG only on local files on your local computer.  You can then use TMG to make a Backup which will create an SQZ file.  You can then move or copy that file either to a folder controlled by a backup system, or to a folder which is on the cloud.  If you have external exhibit files you also can store copies on a backup system or a cloud.  But everything TMG deals with should be on a local and unmonitored disk.

 

Hope this is clear,


Michael
See my book on how I customize TMG My Way.
My website.

#3 hmscook

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    Timothy Cook

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 07:46 PM

Hello Michael,

 

Thank you for the response. I have just begun to explore the uses of the cloud. I was wondering if anyone had tried it with TMG and what the results were. Better to learn from someone else's experiences.

 

Just as a side note I am fairly well versed in how to use SQZ files. I have been using TMG since before version one came out and was a beta tester until it was discontinued.

 

Cheers,

 

Tim Cook

Busby, MT



#4 Jim Byram

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 02:28 PM

Just to expand on the topic, there are two types of undertaking here...

 

1)  Use a project that is actually located on a server.

 

TMG's networking tools are weak at best and users have experienced various problems connecting to servers.

 

The only genealogy database manager that is designed to work with the database on a server (and thus allowing sharing) is Ancestral Quest. If any others have been added to this list of one, please update this discussion.

 

2) Syncing with a server (Dropbox, OneDrive, iCloud, Google Drive, Amazon, others) using a local client.

 

Based on my collective experience repairing (or attempting to repair) user projects who have undertaken to sync their live project, I'd say that this is a surefire way to destroy a project.

 

You don't want to sync any file that has to do with working on a live TMG project.

 

You can sync anything not connected to a live project... for example, TMG backup files that have been copied to a folder being synced.

 

The fundamental problem is that a TMG project is a _set_ of 48 files that all must be in tune with one another. Get any one file out of sync with the other files in the project and the project is corrupted.



#5 hmscook

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    Timothy Cook

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 05:33 PM

Hello Jim,

 

Thanks so much. I had suspected this but was not sure. I have a new laptop with Office 365 and Onedrive and just don't know much about either yet. I was doing some experimenting with Onedrive Saturday and just wanted to know what if any were the possibilities. Always better to learn these lessons before the fact than after the fact. BTW hope all is well with you. It has been a long time since we last spoke.

 

Cheers

 

Tim



#6 Michael Freeland

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Posted 11 December 2017 - 03:51 PM

Thanks for the helpful warnings! I am about to take Laptop #1 to the repair shop, and wanted to install and use TMG on Laptop #2. Sounds as though I had better copy all of the TMG files (including external exhibits) onto Laptop 2, and then use Dropbox only for central storage of .SQZ files. Tedious, but safer. Any tips on the most efficient way to get everything onto Laptop #2?

 

Thanks,

 

Michael


Cheers!

 

Michael


#7 Michael Hannah

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 08:07 AM

For the data, backup every project and copy over the SQZ files. For the program, get a copy of the installer and do an actual install of the program.
Michael
See my book on how I customize TMG My Way.
My website.

#8 Terry Reigel

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 08:42 AM

After you have copied the backups and installed the program as Michael says, you need to pay attention to changes in paths between the old and new computers. That's described in my article at http://tmg.reigelrid...rsion.htm#paths


Terry

See my Tutorials and Articles on using TMG at tmg.reigelridge.com

The Second Edition of my book, A Primer for The Master Genealogist, is still available
. For more information see my website.

#9 pktropics

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 02:52 PM

I have been syncing TMG databases between desktop and laptop computers for years, without problem. But with care! 1. Always make a backup before syncing, 2. Never use the two machines simultaneously - that is, re-sync before shifting from one machine to the other. 3. Maintain the same file path structure and labeling on each machine. I use the desktop in the office, and laptop in the field, so the risk of mixing things up is minimal.




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