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Wholly Genes Newsletter, 22 June 2006, Issue 2006-9


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#1 Bob Velke

Bob Velke
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Posted 22 June 2006 - 07:41 PM

==================================================
Wholly Genes Newsletter
22 June 2006
Issue 2006, Number 9
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In this issue:

o Half price on TMG training tapes on VHS
o Your 20% discount coupon will expire soon
o Researcher wins NGS award with help from TMG
o Accessing Google Maps from TMG
o New books in the web store
o New data CDs in the web store
o TMG Companion Products
o Wholly Genes online chat
o How to reach us


==== Half price on TMG training tapes on VHS ==========

While the remaining supply last, you can get TMG training tapes on VHS tape (Getting Started, Intermediate, or Advanced) for HALF PRICE. That's just $7.98 per tape (or $13.98 for the Getting Started and Intermediate bundle).
Each video includes about an hour and a half of instruction on TMG and is narrated by Bob Velke, President of Wholly Genes Software. It is a great way to learn how to use TMG or to refresh your memory about features that you'd long forgotten.

These VHS tapes have been discontinued in favor of the more popular DVD format but the instructional content is the same.

Supply is very limited so order today because when they're gone they won't come back:
http://www.WhollyGen...01SPECIALOFFERS


==== Your 20% discount coupon will expire soon ========

Every user of TMG Gold Edition v6.09 is issued a certificate worth 20% discount off their first purchase of data CDs from the Wholly Genes web store - but for most people that certificate expires in a few days!

To obtain or review your certificate, run TMG and access the Message Manager from the Help menu. If your discount coupon isn't visible, click on the "Display previous messages" check box near the bottom of the screen.

This is a great opportunity to get a 20% discount on your selection of data CDs, including these popular titles:

- Savage's "A Genealogical Dictionary of The First Settlers
of New England" (1860).
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=US0205

- Goodwin's "First Settlers of Connecticut &
Massachusetts" (1856).
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=US0252

- Farmer's "Genealogical Register of the First Settlers of
New England (1829).
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=US0261

- Noyes' et al, "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New
Hampshire" (1928-1939).
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=US0288

- Spencer's "Pioneers on Maine Rivers" (1930).
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=US0290

- Black's Law Dictionary, First (1890) and Second (1910)
Editions.
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=US0211

...and thousands of other digitized and searchable rare genealogy publications from the U.S., England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Canada, and Australia.

Your discount certificate can also be used to purchase any of the new data CDs listed below.

Don't miss the expiration date! Take advantage of this one-time offer today.


==== Researcher wins NGS award with help from TMG ====

Here's proof of what TMG can do for you.

The National Genealogical Society recently announced its 2006 "Award for Excellence: Genealogy and Family History (published book)". And the winner is Terence T. Quirke, Jr., Ph.D., F.I.G.R.S. for his book, "Quirke Genealogy and Family History of Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland"

Terence is a TMG user and wrote to explain how he did it:

The basis of the Quirke book was the journal report from TMG.
I used the "custom format" option with the standard tags:
birth, baptism, marriage, death, and burial. I also used a
custom "Biography" tag with a sort date that was after the
burial date of the person, or if living, 100 years beyond the
person's birth date. Thus the narrative of the person's life
came after the initial opening paragraph giving the obligatory
birth, marriage and death data. This narrative contained all
I could find about the person beyond the initial stuff and all
this additional material had the sources cited with
embedded citations.

When I finally felt that additional research had reached the
classic point of diminishing returns, instead of printing the
journal report to the screen and printing a hard copy from
there, I printed it to WordPerfect file. I could have done
some additional formatting in TMG, but I preferred to do it
in WP.

TMG did all I needed to have done for compilation and for
basic genealogical record keeping, but I found that a
wordprocessor was a special tool worth using for the final
formatting, spell checking, picture placements, maps and
other special effects.

Evidently the book created from TMG and "touched up"
with a wordprocessor produced a worthy result.

Congratulations, Terence! We're happy to see you use TMG exactly as it was designed to be used. Anyone who wants to publish their research will want to tweak the output as you did -- and that's why TMG offers the option to output reports to the native format of more than 50 word processors.

[Note: Bob Velke, the President of Wholly Genes software, is on the Board of Directors for the National Genealogical Society but did not vote on this award.]


==== Accessing Google Maps from TMG ==============

When viewing a place name on an event screen or the Master Place List in TMG v5 and later, you can click on a button to "Look up this place on the web." The feature will automatically link to a variety of online gazetteers where you'll find descriptive information about the place, including previous names for the place, population, altitude, etc.

You can click on another button in TMG to "Get a map of this place" using MapQuest, Maporama, or other sites. You don't need to export your data or type anything into the web site. You just click on the button and the next thing you know you're looking at a map! If you've entered latitude and longitude in TMG, then it will use those coordinates. Otherwise, the map will be based on the place name.

Now you can access Google Maps from within TMG too.

For add support for Google Maps to your copy of TMG or to learn how to add your own links to the feature, please visit:
http://www.whollygen...om/placemap.htm


==== New books in the web store ===================

The following reference tools are now available from the Wholly Genes web store.

Like all genealogy methodology books, these new additions to our store are 15% OFF the regular retail price!

WHAT DID THEY MEAN BY THAT? A DICTIONARY OF HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL TERMS by Paul Drake, J.D.
http://www.WhollyGen...EWS&p=BWHATMEAN
The family historian must seek out the records of the merchants, courts, legislators, and churches, as well as the everyday expressions of the common men and women, all the while striving to remain aware that just as we have created words like television, computer, microwave oven, automobile, space station, gigabyte, and airplane, and set aside words as ticking and icebox, stadle, and squabpie, our ancestors had to do the same. Mr. Drake, retired lawyer and teacher, and veteran genealogist, writes with a pleasing style that is entertaining and educational.

INTERNATIONAL VITAL RECORDS HANDBOOK (Fourth Edition) by Thomas Jay Kemp
http://www.WhollyGen...EWS&p=BVITALREC
At one time of another all of us need copies of birth, marriage, or death certificates for driver's licenses, passports, jobs, Social Security, family history research, or for simple proof of identity. But the fact is that the application forms needed to obtain copies of vital records vary from state to state and from country to country, often necessitating a tedious and time-wasting exchange of correspondence. The International Vital Records Handbook is designed to put an end to all that, as it offers a complete, up-to-date collection of vital records application forms from nations throughout the world, thus simplifying and speeding up the process by which vital records are obtained.

Highlights of the First New Edition in 6 years:

* Covers all the countries of the world including North America, the British Isles, and Europe.

* New application forms! Contains hundreds of new or updated forms from home and around the world.

* New data! Includes current addresses and phone numbers, with fax numbers, e-mail addresses, and web sites, if available, as well as fees, starting dates of records, and alternative record locations.

* Over 200 pages longer than previous editions! Loads of more information!


==== New data CDs in the web store =================

The following new data CDs are now available from the Wholly Genes web store:

Nathaniel B. Shurtleff, RECORDS OF THE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY OF THE MASSACHUSETTS BAY IN NEW ENGLAND, 1628- 1686, 1853-1854
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=US0208
This massive series of volumes documents the development of the Massachusetts Bay Company into Massachusetts Bay Colony, providing a dense chronological record of the colony's civil, criminal and administrative court proceedings. Thousands of early New England colonists pass through these pages.

INDEXES TO IRISH WILLS 1536-1858, 5 VOLS
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0037
This series of five volumes was compiled from the existing finding aids at the Public Record Office in Dublin, and published between 1909 and 1920. They contain entries for over 30,000 wills for most of the diocesan consistorial courts of Ireland up to 1800, and many up to 1858 when the administration of wills and probate was removed from church control to the state. Each entry records the testator's name, address and year of probate, as well as frequent reference to social status or occupation. The first two volumes were compiled by William Phillimore Watts. After his death in 1913 the tireless Irish genealogist Gertrude Thrift continued the work. The series was cut short by the destruction of the PRO in 1922.

MATHESON'S SPECIAL REPORT ON SURNAMES IN IRELAND (1894)
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0047
Published by the General Register Office, this study is the first detailed official work on surnames in Ireland. Sir Robert E. Matheson used the 1890 birth registers to compile an authoritative list of surnames and their frequency and distribution throughout the country. He begins with a list of the 100 most common surnames in the country in order of frequency, and then compares this against those in England and Scotland. This book includes a detailed account of the derivation and ethnology of Irish names, tracing each wave of migration from the Celts and Vikings through to the migration of Russian and Polish Jews in the 1880s. Matheson then lists the main surnames (and numbers of births) for each county, following which he provides a fascinating look at the continued local concentrations of many surnames. Thereafter the book contains extensive tables of the distribution of over 2,600 surnames in Ireland. These tables give the numbers of births in 1890, and the counties and provinces where these births were recorded.

THE IRISH EMIGRANT'S GUIDE FOR THE UNITED STATES, 1890
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0041
While this is the second edition of this book it is the first edition published in Ireland. Much of the contents of this book focus on practical issues facing those emigrating to the United States and looks to dispel any of the romantic notions the Irish emigrant may have had towards America. It does contain many useful tips for emigrating, such as surviving the trans-Atlantic crossing, securing employment on arrival, farming, notes on the climate and condition of the land including prices and also general expenses. The guide concludes with an alphabetical list of the trans-Atlantic steamers and details of the pricing, ports of departure and arrival. This guide was an essential source for those emigrating to America.

DODD’S TRAVELLER'S DIRECTOR THROUGH IRELAND (1801)
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0030
James Solas Dodd’s Traveller’s ‘Director’ is a less well known guide to Ireland, published in 1801 to cater for English people wishing to holiday in Ireland. The book begins with a description of Dublin city, including a detailed engraved map. He then tours the country following all the main roads throughout the island. For each place he describes the topography, economy, public buildings, gentlemen’s houses, religious buildings, antiquities, curiosities, and gives a lot of historical information. The book concludes with a section on the major natural curiosities in Ireland (e.g. the Giant’s Causeway), and a guide to getting to Ireland from England. The book contains an excellent map of Ireland by Stockdale.

MR. TUKE'S FUND FOR ASSISTED EMIGRATION 1882-5
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0048
This extraordinary book, was a private collection of 20 separately published pieces relating to work by the Committee of Mr. Tuke's Fund. This fund was established in 1882 to assist emigration from the west of Ireland to America, specifically the Unions of Belmullet, Newport & Swineford in Co. Mayo, and Clifden, Oughterard and the Aran Islands in Co. Galway. 9,482 people were assisted by this fund up to 1885, and this book contains a vast amount of detail about the working of the fund, but also about the experience of the emigrants themselves. This includes extensive descriptions of the places where emigrants came from, the emigrants themselves, the process of emigration (including anecdotal reports on their experiences), where they went (USA, Canada and Australia), a detailed list of the specific places they were settled in the US, dates of emigration and sailing details. Most unusually the book contains extensive letters home from the emigrants on arrival. It also analyses what happened to their small holdings in Ireland after they left, giving a full list of emigrants' names and the townlands they came from.

O'HART'S IRISH & ANGLO-IRISH LANDED GENTRY
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=IE0015
This is one of O'Hart's main publications of family pedigrees from Ireland. In this volume he focuses mainly on families who settled in Ireland from Britain from the medieval period up to the 19th century. This volume contains 231 pedigrees of individual families, dating from as early as the 12th century up to the year of publication (1884). The book also contains copious appendices of historic documents. Many of these deal with the Cromwellian period, including the transplantation to Connaught and the Commonwealth soldiers. There are further records concerning other land settlements from the 17th century, Irishmen serving in continental European armies, and much more besides.

CARRIGAN’S HISTORY OF THE DIOCESE OF OSSORY AND NEW INDEX
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=IE0016
William Carrigan’s History of the Diocese of Ossory (4 vols, 1905) is one of the most important historical publications concerning Counties Kilkenny and Laois ever produced.
Carrigan’s main interest was the history of the church from the earliest times, and his four volumes, contain a history of the Bishops and other diocesan officials, as well as an extensive introduction to the area’s political history. Thereafter he journeys from parish to parish recording a vast amount of information concerning all aspects of the area’s history, always with special emphasis on religion. His books are copiously illustrated with photographs, maps and drawings, reflecting his desire to record the antiquities of the Diocese. Importantly, the four volumes contain extensive extracts and transcripts of original manuscript material, much of which was lost in the destruction of the PRO in 1922. This digital publication of Carrigan’s work also includes the first ever comprehensive index to his work by Helen Litton (published in 2005). This Index also contains an extensive biographical study on Carrigan by Fearghus Ó Fearghail and a foreword by the current Bishop of Ossory, Laurence Forristal. (in association with the Diocese of Ossory)

CUSACK'S HISTORY OF THE KINGDOM OF KERRY, 1871
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=IE0017
M.F. Cusack's history of Kerry is an important nineteenth century work containing a vast amount of information. The book charts the history of the county from earliest times, including extracts from many documents. These include the complete text of the 1673 report on State of Kerry, the Charters of the towns of Dingle and Tralee, etc. The book is particularly valuable for genealogists, as the author publishes important pedigrees of key Gaelic families from Kerry, such as O'Connor, O'Donoghue, O'Connell, O'Mahony, MacGillicuddy, MacCarthy Mor, and O'Moriarty. She also publishes a complete list of members of parliament for the county from 1613, giving extensive genealogical information about each MP.

D'ALTON'S HISTORY OF DUBLIN (1838)
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=IE0019
This book is probably the first really detailed local history published in Ireland. Spanning to 955 pages, it has a wealth of information on virtually every location in the county. It begins with a general account of the county's history in 50 pages. This followed by a tour of every barony in the county, with chapters on each town, village and prominent place encountered. These chapters contain a full description of the topographical, economic and cultural aspects of the area. This is followed by a detailed examination of the history and antiquities from earliest times to 1838. D'Alton was especially interested in the local families in each area, and provides a great detail of information about them throughout the book. With some families he even devotes an entire chapter to their history. These include the Vernon, St. Lawrence, Talbot, Fagan, Taylor, Barnewall, De La Field, Stanyhurst, Hamilton and Eustace families. However the book contains a wealth of detail on every subject, and remains one of the most important local histories produced in the 19th century. It is an essential tool for the study of County Dublin and its people.

HICKSON, SELECTIONS FROM OLD KERRY RECORDS (2 VOLS, 1872-74)
http://www.WhollyGen...d=NEWS&p=IE0020
These two books contain a wealth of historical and genealogical information for County Kerry. Compiled by the celebrated Kerry antiquarian and genealogist, Mary Agnes Hickson, they cover a vast range of topics from the medieval period to the 19th century. These include transcripts of many documents since lost. Some of the articles contained in this publication include the 1641 depositions, details of those who lost their lands in the 1688 forfeitures, persons transplanted from Kerry in 1653 and details of the loss of lands under Cromwell in the 1650s. There is an extensive study of the county in the 18th century, a full list of high sheriffs of the county from the 16th to the 19th century, and details of Kerrymen fighting in continental European forces in 1792. The books contain a great deal of specifically genealogical information too, including gravestone inscriptions, family histories and pedigrees (including Blennerhassett and the Knight of Kerry), the Crosbie family papers, and many genealogical notices. The books also contain three reproductions of maps of the county dated 1600 from the Carew Manuscripts. There are many other topics and articles across the 693 pages in these publications. Also of interest the books contain hand-written detailed notes by their former owner, Ellen O'Connell, the daughter of Daniel O'Connell.

BASSETT’S BOOK OF COUNTY ARMAGH 1888
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0023
Bassett’s Book of Armagh is both a directory and a guide to the entire county in 1888. It is one of the most important sources published for late nineteenth century Armagh, recording details (addresses and occupations) for over 10,000 people in the county. It contains over 400 pages of detailed information, as well as an excellent full colour map. The book begins with the history, economy, geology and social life of the county. This is followed by a full directory for every town and village, giving the names and details for all office-holders, professionals, merchants and tradesmen, as well as a full alphabetical directory of farmers and other residents not listed by trade. There is a detailed introduction to each town and village, with information about the economy, history, religion, railways, post, and general character of the place. The book finishes with a list of fairs and markets in the county, and an index.

BASSETT’S COUNTY DOWN GUIDE AND DIRECTORY 1886
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0025
Bassett’s County Down is both a directory and a guide to the entire county in 1886. It is one of the most important sources published for late nineteenth century Down, recording details (addresses and occupations) for over 10,000 people in the county. It contains 414 pages of detailed information, as well as an excellent full colour map. The book begins with the history, economy, geology and social life of the county. This is followed by a full directory for every town and village, giving the names and details for all office-holders, professionals, merchants and tradesmen, as well as a full alphabetical directory of farmers and other residents not listed by trade. There is a detailed introduction to each town and village, with information about the economy, history, religion, railways, post, and general character of the place. It includes an extended treatment for the borough of Newry. The book finishes with an index of places, and includes many commercial advertisements.

BASSETT’S WEXFORD COUNTY GUIDE AND DIRECTORY 1885
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0026
Bassett’s Wexford is both a directory and a guide to the entire county in 1885. It is one of the most important sources published for late nineteenth century Wexford, recording details (addresses and occupations) for over 11,000 people in the county. It contains 406 pages of detailed information, as well as an excellent full colour map. The book begins with the history, economy, geology and social life of the county. This is followed by a full directory for every town and village, giving the names and details for all office-holders, professionals, merchants and tradesmen, as well as a full alphabetical directory of farmers and other residents not listed by trade. There is a detailed introduction to each town and village, with information about the economy, history, religion, railways, post, and general character of the place. It includes an extended treatment for the borough of Wexford, and the towns of New Ross, Enniscorthy and Gorey. The book finishes with an index of places, a list of fairs and markets, and includes many commercial advertisements.

STATISTICAL SURVEY OF COUNTY CORK, 1810
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0028
The Irish Statistical Survey was carried out under the direction of the Royal Dublin Society. Each county was surveyed with the aim of determining the ‘actual state, capabilities and defects of agriculture, manufactures and rural economy’. In practice the surveys contained a vast quantity of local information on almost every aspect of the county surveyed. Because these studies were carried out under central direction the quality of the information provided is good, and given their early date, they remain an invaluable source for the study of each county. They record many details about conditions in pre-Famine Ireland, including social and economic conditions, the growth of population and poverty, education, religion, history, the Irish language and local customs. The Cork survey was published in 1810. It covers the entire county, barony by barony, treating all of the main topics in 896 pages. This includes a detailed full colour map of the county. The study ends with an extended conclusion on the main problems towards the advancement of Cork.

STATISTICAL SURVEY OF COUNTY DONEGAL, 1802
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0036
The Irish Statistical Survey was carried out under the direction of the Royal Dublin Society. Each county was surveyed with the aim of determining the ‘actual state, capabilities and defects of agriculture, manufactures and rural economy’. In practice the surveys contained a vast quantity of local information on almost every aspect of the county surveyed. Because these studies were carried out under central direction the quality of the information provided is good, and given their early date, they remain an invaluable source for the study of each county. They record many details about conditions in pre-Famine Ireland, including social and economic conditions, the growth of population and poverty, education, religion, history, the Irish language and local customs. The Donegal survey was carried out by James McParlan, a medical doctor, published in 1802. It covers all of the main topics as well as an extensive treatment of the reasons for the poor condition of many of the rural population, which he firmly blames on the excessive production of whiskey! This book is exceptionally important for Donegal, where information is sparse for the early nineteenth century.

STATISTICAL SURVEY OF COUNTY CLARE, 1808
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0042
The Irish Statistical Survey was carried out under the direction of the Royal Dublin Society. Each county was surveyed with the aim of determining the 'actual state, capabilities and defects of agriculture, manufactures and rural economy'. In practice the surveys contained a vast quantity of local information on almost every aspect of the county surveyed. Because these studies were carried out under central direction the quality of the information provided is good, and given their early date, they remain an invaluable source for the study of each county. They record many details about conditions in pre-Famine Ireland, including social and economic conditions, the growth of population and poverty, education, religion, history, the Irish language and local customs. Healy Dutton's introduction contains a very stinging rebuke of the wealthy farmers and the gentry for their lack or co-operation in compiling the survey and their "gross ignorance". However, he does also note the remarkable hospitality of the people of the county, though they have yet to learn to "put the cork in the bottle". This is a vital source for anyone with an interest in the history of County Clare.

SLATER'S COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY OF IRELAND, 1881, COMPENDIUM OF ALL SECTIONS
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0035
This superb book includes a full commercial directory for the entire country. Organised by Province, and then town, it lists all the principal office holders, gentry, professionals, trades, hotels, schools, public institutions, churches, and even pubs for each town in Ireland. This is the third edition of Slaters, for the year 1881, and contains 1,580 pages of information including a large-scale map of Ireland.

BURKE'S LANDED GENTRY OF IRELAND, 1899
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0039
This was the first specifically Irish edition of Burke’s Landed Gentry, and is considerably more detailed on Irish families than what had appeared in previous years in the general British series. It contains detailed genealogies of all the ‘landed gentry’ in Ireland. This group represents the Irish landowners, and those aspiring to this status from among the merchant and professional community. But the value of this source is not just for this narrow group, as the genealogies are extensive, covering all collateral lines, junior branches and in-laws, many of whom would have been of more modest means. The genealogies recorded were overwhelming those developed by the Ulster King of Arms (the Chief Herald in nineteenth century Ireland) and are quite valuable and largely reliable. As a source it is important for all those studying Irish genealogy, especially those whose ancestors were part of this social class.

MEDICAL DIRECTORY FOR IRELAND, 1852
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0040
This publication was the first full medical directory of Ireland, published in 1852. It includes all medical practitioners who held a qualification, either as an apothecary (pharmacist) or a medical doctor throughout Ireland. There are several thousand names recorded, reflecting the huge growth in the Irish medical profession following the establishment of the dispensaries across the country with the Poor Law Unions. With this development, the discipline changed fundamentally from a small middle-class profession, to allow a much wider section of the population to provide these services. As a consequence the book records an extensive list of people from every walk of life. The Directory also records the location, as well as many details, about every hospital, dispensary, medical school, public health service, society, asylum, and medical institutions in Ireland. There is a list of obituaries at the end, and a list of Spa physicians in Germany that had become popular with the well to do!

KENNY'S IRISH MANUFACTURERS' DIRECTORY, 1919
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0044
Kevin Kenny’s Manufacturers’ Directory is an exceptionally rare and unusual book. While he includes an exceptionally detailed directory of all businesses throughout the country from ‘Abdominal Belt’ to ‘Zinc Ware’ manufacturers, he includes much more besides. The book contains the most complete directory of local and national press at that time, which he includes to assist businesses to advertise their products and services. It also includes copious industrial statistics for the country, a complete list of Irish Trade Marks registered, and other details. However, almost half the book is devoted to an analysis of all branches of Irish industry, manufactures and agriculture. From ‘Altar Candles’ to ‘Woollens’ Kenny gives his assessment of the opportunities for development. The book is prefaced with a clarion call for reconstruction of the Irish economy in the wake of World War One, with Kenny’s own analysis of the enormous potential for industrial growth.

TYNER'S TRAVELLER'S GUIDE THROUGH IRELAND, 1794
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0045
Published in 1794 this book was a companion to the map produced by Alexander Taylor. Tyner's companion gives "The distance by the great roads from Dublin to every town in the Kingdom, the cross roads, and descriptions of the gentlemen's seats near the road". Not only are the directions and mileages included but also detailed descriptions of the journey, which also include many observations on the surrounding countryside and buildings. Included at the end are the great and direct roads from London to Holyhead. George Tyner had added his own map of Ireland to enhance the publication. Much like Taylor and Skinner's Road Maps of Ireland this is a remarkable and rare publication. In place of the maps are detailed written directions. As a companion to Alexander Taylor's Map of Ireland this is an essential research tool for anyone studying late 18th century Irish history.

THE SCOT IN ULSTER, 1888
http://www.WhollyGen...=NEWS&p=IET0046
Sometimes given the sub title of sketches of the history of the Scottish settlers in Ulster this book was originally published as a series of articles in the Scotsman newspaper in the spring of 1888, which were written by the Edinburgh based journalist John Harrison. Written at a time when Home Rule was becoming increasingly popular this publication attempts to justify the right of the people of Ulster to protest against any separation from the Union with Great Britain. Harrison traces the history of the Scot in Ulster from the beginning right through the Plantation of Ulster, the Rebellion of 1641, the 1798 Rebellion and beyond the 1801 Act of Union. He emphasizes the point that the Scot in Ulster was fundamentally different from the native Irish, that they were in fact two separate races even in 1888. But he hoped that the chasm between the two could be bridged but that would only occur "if they both continue to live in the full communion of that great empire".


==== TMG Companion Products =====================

The following companion products which were developed for TMG users like you:

"Getting the Most Out of The Master Genealogist"
The popular book compiled by Lee Hoffman.
See http://www.WhollyGen...tingthemost.htm

Video training for TMG on DVD
Getting Started, Intermediate, Advanced, or Expert
See http://www.WhollyGen.../videotapes.htm

Second Site
Web site construction tools for your TMG data.
See http://www.WhollyGen.../secondsite.htm
Latest version=1.9 Build 9

Pocket Genealogist
The TMG companion program for Pocket PCs and other Windows Powered devices.
See http://www.WhollyGen...m/pocketgen.htm
Latest version=2.97

GedStar PRO
The TMG companion program for PalmOS users.
See http://www.WhollyGen.../gedstarpro.htm
Latest version=3.1

GenSmarts
The research advisor that reads your TMG data directly.
See http://www.WhollyGen...m/gensmarts.htm
Latest version=1.0.9.16

Chartform Delivery
An inexpensive chart printing service
See http://www.WhollyGen.../wallcharts.htm

For the full list of companion products, please visit the Wholly Genes Community forum (http://www.WhollyGenes.com/forums.htm) and click on "Companion Products."


=== Wholly Genes online chat =======================

The next online chat with Wholly Genes will be on Saturday, 24 June 2006, at 2pm EDT and again at 11pm Eastern Time. Don't miss this opportunity to "talk" online with Wholly Genes representatives, as well as with other TMG users around the world.

Remember that the Wholly Genes chat room is available to you at any time. Just go to http://www.WhollyGenes.com and click on Chat in the menu. When you see the security warning, click on <Grant this session> or <Grant always>. Then be patient because it could take 30 seconds or more (especially on a dial-up connection) to load the necessary chat tools. When prompted, simply enter a chat nickname and then click on Connect. That's all there is to it. We hope to see you there!


==== How to reach us =============================

For tech support, please access the Wholly Genes Community message board at:
http://www.WhollyGenes.com/forums.htm
or write to:
support@whollygenes.com

Please be sure to note what version of the program you are using.

You can also reach us at:

Wholly Genes Software
9110 Red Branch Road, Suite "O"
Columbia, Maryland 21045
410-715-2260
410-379-5424 (fax)
http://www.WhollyGenes.com
Bob Velke
President
Wholly Genes Software




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