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Land Grant Tag


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#1 joanmc

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 08:40 PM

This tag is primarily for Loyalist land grants in Ontario (which was Canada/Upper Canada/Canada West/Ontario depending on the time frame) and will have a single principal - the recipient. The process involves (usually) the filing of a petition, issuing of a warrant then issuing of a patent. The patent could involve a separate tag but I haven't set it up that way at present.

I have not yet structured a sentence

B)
Joan
Joan McIlmoyl Cleghorn, U.E.
From Beautiful Saseenos, near Sooke & Victoria BC Canada
genealogy@joansjoy.ca
Joan's Joy of Learning

#2 GenerationGoneBy

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 08:57 PM

Joan,
Here's mine created mostly for TN and KY, but should work. These were for land patents, but also work for land grants. You may want to get rid of the descriptive text, or add some that is more appropriate to your needs.


I actually use several tags.

Land Grant-Warrant (this is KY specific)
Grantee-[:CR:][:TAB:]The first step in the patent process was to get a Warrant. They identify how much land may be surveyed, the reason for the warrant's issuance, the date of issuance, and the name of the warrant purchaser or recipient. Warrants do not identify land location. Warrants could be sold, traded, or reassigned in whole or in part. They could be divided to authorize more than one survey of unappropriated land. There are several different types of warrants. Only a small percentage of Kentucky land patents were authorized by military warrants. [R:Grantee] obtained a warrant <from [M1]> [D] < [L]>. <[M2]>

NOTE: M1 is the state or county and M2 is for the memo. If he received it from a person, I would create a GRANTOR role and put from Grantor in that part of the sentence. I haven't found any like that yet.


Land Grant-Entry
Grantee--[:CR:][:TAB:]Once a warrant is obtained, a filing is made in the county surveyor's Entry Book reserving the land for patenting. The date of entry would be listed. The entry included the name of the person, the type of warrant used, the location of the land to be surveyed, including the closest watercourse, if known. Entries protected applicants' claims until surveyors were able to plot the tract. [R:Grantee] filed his entry in the patent office [D] < [L]>. <[M]>

Land Grant-Survey
Grantee--[:CR:][:TAB:]The third step in land patenting is the survey. The survey certificate includes a plat drawing and a description of the property. Surveys could be traded, sold, or reassigned any time during the patenting process. Each survey includes the following information: The name of person having survey made, County in which land is located , the type and identification number of warrants along with previous owner of warrant, if applicable, the nearest watercourse, and the Metes & Bounds description. It would often name adjacent property owners (joiners). The back of the survey may include assignments, the patent number, and the date of grant issuance. [R:Grantee] had his land surveyed [D] < [L]>. <[M]>

#3 joanmc

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 09:06 PM

The process is quite similar except no survey during the process - it was surveyed prior to the granting of the land but the legal description was part of the warrant/grant, often simply stating the lot and concession and the township, e.g. RT (Royal Township) #3 or #5 and repeated when the patent was issued once the requirements were met.

Thanks so much - I'll have a go with a couple tomorrow and post the results - now, here's a question - if I simply copy & paste what a report on this event would say, I guess I could put that in here? So that others could see the end result & how a sentence actually reads when printed?

B)
Joan

Joan,
Here's mine created mostly for TN and KY, but should work. These were for land patents, but also work for land grants. You may want to get rid of the descriptive text, or add some that is more appropriate to your needs.
I actually use several tags.

Land Grant-Warrant (this is KY specific)
Grantee-[:CR:][:TAB:]The first step in the patent process was to get a Warrant. They identify how much land may be surveyed, the reason for the warrant's issuance, the date of issuance, and the name of the warrant purchaser or recipient. Warrants do not identify land location. Warrants could be sold, traded, or reassigned in whole or in part. They could be divided to authorize more than one survey of unappropriated land. There are several different types of warrants. Only a small percentage of Kentucky land patents were authorized by military warrants. [R:Grantee] obtained a warrant <from [M1]> [D] < [L]>. <[M2]>

NOTE: M1 is the state or county and M2 is for the memo. If he received it from a person, I would create a GRANTOR role and put from Grantor in that part of the sentence. I haven't found any like that yet.
Land Grant-Entry
Grantee--[:CR:][:TAB:]Once a warrant is obtained, a filing is made in the county surveyor's Entry Book reserving the land for patenting. The date of entry would be listed. The entry included the name of the person, the type of warrant used, the location of the land to be surveyed, including the closest watercourse, if known. Entries protected applicants' claims until surveyors were able to plot the tract. [R:Grantee] filed his entry in the patent office [D] < [L]>. <[M]>

Land Grant-Survey
Grantee--[:CR:][:TAB:]The third step in land patenting is the survey. The survey certificate includes a plat drawing and a description of the property. Surveys could be traded, sold, or reassigned any time during the patenting process. Each survey includes the following information: The name of person having survey made, County in which land is located , the type and identification number of warrants along with previous owner of warrant, if applicable, the nearest watercourse, and the Metes & Bounds description. It would often name adjacent property owners (joiners). The back of the survey may include assignments, the patent number, and the date of grant issuance. [R:Grantee] had his land surveyed [D] < [L]>. <[M]>


Joan McIlmoyl Cleghorn, U.E.
From Beautiful Saseenos, near Sooke & Victoria BC Canada
genealogy@joansjoy.ca
Joan's Joy of Learning

#4 GenerationGoneBy

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 05:51 AM

:huh: The first step in the patent process was to get a Warrant. They identify how much land may be surveyed, the reason for the warrant's issuance, the date of issuance, and the name of the warrant purchaser or recipient. Warrants do not identify land location. Warrants could be sold, traded, or reassigned in whole or in part. They could be divided to authorize more than one survey of unappropriated land. There are several different types of warrants. Only a small percentage of Kentucky land patents were authorized by military warrants. John Smith obtained a warrant from the state of Virginia in 1805 in Halifax County, Virginia. It was for 400 acres of land.
:huh: Once a warrant is obtained, a filing is made in the county surveyor's Entry Book reserving the land for patenting. The date of entry would be listed. The entry included the name of the person, the type of warrant used, the location of the land to be surveyed, including the closest watercourse, if known. Entries protected applicants' claims until surveyors were able to plot the tract. John Smith filed his entry in the patent office in 14 Jun 1806 in Halifax County, Virginia. The land was situated next to James Allen's mill.
:huh: The third step in land patenting is the survey. The survey certificate includes a plat drawing and a description of the property. Surveys could be traded, sold, or reassigned any time during the patenting process. Each survey includes the following information: The name of person having survey made, County in which land is located , the type and identification number of warrants along with previous owner of warrant, if applicable, the nearest watercourse, and the Metes & Bounds description. It would often name adjacent property owners (joiners). The back of the survey may include assignments, the patent number, and the date of grant issuance. John Smith had his land surveyed 14 April 1809 in Halifax County, Virgina. John lived on this land until his death, when he will the entire portion to his eldest son, Jacob.


NOTE: I made all this information up for this example. None of it is real, or correct. The paragraphs were lost in the formating of this site so I have put a :huh: where a paragraph would be in your narrative.

Edited by GenerationGoneBy, 29 July 2007 - 05:54 AM.


#5 joanmc

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 06:30 AM

This is really helpful Teresa, particularly for those who haven't yet printed out any reports so don't know exactly what they would get<g>. Many of us (I'm bad for this myself<g>) spend all our time researching & entering data before ever producing anything beyond a FGS or Ind. Narrative or maybe a Desc Indented so the entire power of custom tags, roles & sentences is not realized. I'm trying to learn about this myself so I can pass it along to our TMG User Group.

B)
Joan

:huh: The first step in the patent process was to get a Warrant. They identify how much land may be surveyed, the reason for the warrant's issuance, the date of issuance, and the name of the warrant purchaser or recipient. Warrants do not identify land location. Warrants could be sold, traded, or reassigned in whole or in part. They could be divided to authorize more than one survey of unappropriated land. There are several different types of warrants. Only a small percentage of Kentucky land patents were authorized by military warrants. John Smith obtained a warrant from the state of Virginia in 1805 in Halifax County, Virginia. It was for 400 acres of land.
:huh: Once a warrant is obtained, a filing is made in the county surveyor's Entry Book reserving the land for patenting. The date of entry would be listed. The entry included the name of the person, the type of warrant used, the location of the land to be surveyed, including the closest watercourse, if known. Entries protected applicants' claims until surveyors were able to plot the tract. John Smith filed his entry in the patent office in 14 Jun 1806 in Halifax County, Virginia. The land was situated next to James Allen's mill.
:huh: The third step in land patenting is the survey. The survey certificate includes a plat drawing and a description of the property. Surveys could be traded, sold, or reassigned any time during the patenting process. Each survey includes the following information: The name of person having survey made, County in which land is located , the type and identification number of warrants along with previous owner of warrant, if applicable, the nearest watercourse, and the Metes & Bounds description. It would often name adjacent property owners (joiners). The back of the survey may include assignments, the patent number, and the date of grant issuance. John Smith had his land surveyed 14 April 1809 in Halifax County, Virgina. John lived on this land until his death, when he will the entire portion to his eldest son, Jacob.
NOTE: I made all this information up for this example. None of it is real, or correct. The paragraphs were lost in the formating of this site so I have put a :huh: where a paragraph would be in your narrative.


Joan McIlmoyl Cleghorn, U.E.
From Beautiful Saseenos, near Sooke & Victoria BC Canada
genealogy@joansjoy.ca
Joan's Joy of Learning




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